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A survey for office supplies group Viking

22nd May 2014

A survey for office supplies group Viking found that the price of a happy worker is just £476 a year as long as employers spend it the right way. Small companies can boost their workforce’s morale by investing that amount per staff member in a combination of social events such as trips to the pub and training courses, according to the new research.

More than four out of 10 employees working in businesses with fewer than 50 staff said they were unhappy at work. But managers could raise happiness levels by 35% if they spent £286 on training and £190 on staff outings.

The figure was derived by asking workers what the biggest factors of being happy, or unhappy, were during their working day. These were then put against the three most consistently reported drivers – training, social outings and salary – to discover the ‘price of happiness’.

The data revealed that with targeted spending of just £476, moral could be improved by more than third, while a pay rise of £5,000 yielded only a 3% increase.

The most common causes given as making workers unhappy were stress, not feeling challenged by their roles and poor internal communication about the company’s goals and aims. Another area that could boost levels of employee engagement was utilising unproductive times efficiently. The research found that from 10am until noon on Tuesdays staff were operating at their peak performance, while from 4pm until 6pm on Mondays and Fridays they were at their worst. It suggested using these periods for updates on the bigger picture for the company.

UK labour market for April

09th May 2014

The latest KPMG/REC report on the UK labour market for April shows it continues to be in a very healthy state. Permanent staff placements rose at a strong and accelerated rate, although the rate of expansion remained below February’s recent peak. Temp billings also rose at a robust pace, albeit the lowest since June 2013.

Demand for staff remains strong with a further increase in vacancy levels during April. The rate of growth in demand for staff was broadly unchanged from March’s elevated pace.

However, the availability of candidates to fill positions declined at a faster rate in April For permanent candidates, the latest fall was the sharpest since October 2004, while for temporary workers it was the steepest since December 2000.

This decline in availability has started to fuel growth in permanent salaries which accelerated further in April, the most marked increase since July 2007. Temporary staff pay also increased.

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